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tortle:

sizvideos:

Video

Actually!
This puffer in’t being inquisitive, this puffer is hunting!

Pufferfish eat snails, so they are just adorably figuring out the best way to eat their dinner. \uwu/

(via wolfgangamadeusbr0zart)

deepseanews:

“I know you drowned him in the ocean, these bones don’t lie…” Ever heard of forensic limnology? Neither had I, until I had a random conversation during a coffee break. The police find a body in the water. How did it get there? How did this person actually die? Was this a tragic acc…

http://deepseanews.com/2014/09/diagnosing-death-with-diatoms/

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

mean-guign-photography:

Mototi Octopus (Amphioctopus siamensis) - Dauin, Philippines

no octopus were touched or thrown in the making of this photo!

Wheeee!

omnireboot:

From OMNI Magazine 1981 

Check out more OMNI Reboot now!

(via sun-beneath-the-sea)

fer1972:

Apex: The Sharks of Dave White

(Source: davewhiteart.com)

libutron:

Red Beach - The March of the Red Crabs

What you see in the five first photos are baby Christmas Island Red Crabs, Gecarcoidea natalis (Decapoda - Gecarcinidae), emerging from the ocean, and making their way to the forest, as seen in January of this 2014.

These crabs are endemic to the Christmas Island. For most of the year the red crabs are found within forest, but each year these crabs must migrate to the coast to breed (last photo). The estimated population of adult red crabs on Christmas Island was 43.7 million in 2001, so the migration is really impressive.

The arrival of the monsoonal rains allows increased activity of red crabs and stimulates the annual migration. During this breeding migration red crabs, like other terrestrial gecarcinids, must abandon their home ranges and travel down to the coast to mate and spawn. The downward migration normally requires at least a week, and the crabs migrate mainly during the first few hours of the morning and in the late afternoon.

The males excavate burrows, which they must defend from other males, on the lowest shore terraces; mating occurs in or near the burrows. Soon after mating the males start the journey back inland to the forest, while the females lay their eggs and remain in the burrows for 2 weeks. At the end of the incubation period the females vacate their burrows and make their way to the coastal cliffs, which almost completely surround the island, to cast their eggs into the ocean. The females usually release their eggs into the sea toward dawn, around the turn of the high tide, and then they return to the forest.

Eggs hatch immediately in the sea and the larvae (now called megalope) live in the sea for about a month before returning to land as juvenile crabs. These juvenile crabs start a first migration to the forest as seen in the first photos.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Kirsty Faulkner | Locality: Christmas Island (2014)

popsealife:

Armor Upgrade

Some species of hermit crab fortify their defenses by attaching stinging sea anemones onto their shells.

This upgrade is enough to repel even crafty predators such as octopuses, whose arms recoil when coming into contact with the anemone’s stinging tentacles.

Large hermits can stack multiple anemones onto their shells, increasing their defenses further. Crabs with more anemones are less likely to be attacked by predators. 

The anemone supposedly benefits from this arrangement too—the hermit crab provides it with motility, food (thanks to the crab’s messy eating), and protection against fire worms (which prey upon the anemone).

image source: Warren Photographic

reference: Atkinson. 2012.

thatfishchick:

Have you see this article from BBC? http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/29210991

It’s amazing news. Dr. Tristan Rich of the Lort Smith Animal Hospital in Melboune, Australia, performed surgery on a goldfish to remove a large tumor from the animal’s head. The fish - named George (how friggin’ cute) - had a sizable tumor that was reportedly impeding its ability to swim, properly breathe, and eat. George’s owners also reported bullying and/or harassment from other fish in the pond fish.

George’s owners were faced with a unique choice. As a ten year old goldfish in a pond, it is not outside the realm of possibilities that George could live for another ten or twenty years if the surgery was attempted. Without, his long term fate remained uncertain, and his quality of life was certainly poor.

Dr. Rich placed George under anesthesia and, in a rather clever move, used water from George’s pond pumped into the mouth and out the gills to ventilate the fish (rather smart because it means no jarring chemical shifts that could place further stress on George’s body).

George is reportedly doing well post surgery.

It’s an utterly amazing story.